2018–

The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego


The Sanctuary Print Shop originated at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, exploring the history of the sanctuary ordinance in the state of California. The next print shop opened at The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Again at MCASD we turned the museum into a space for collaboration, dialogue, and action, De La Torre and Treggiari invite visitors to raise their voice as they activate the print shop through a series of workshops and conversations with immigrants, lawyers, activist, and others. Also included was a video timeline documenting this history will examine San Diego’s relationship to immigration and a wheat pasted wall using the posters created at YBCA.


2018–

For Freedoms Project


For the For Freedoms project the Sanctuary City Project created the billboard, “THE COUNTRY OF THE IMMIGRANT IS HERE.”  The billboard was located on Mission Street between 19th and 20th st in San Francisco CA.


2018–

Minnesota Street Projects, re:home


Sponsored by the Goethe Institute, re:home is a For Freedoms exhibition and community action that examines how the broad societal crises of sanctuary city, homelessness, and the flight of the creative class intersect in the San Francisco Bay Area.

2018–

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Get With The Action 

Bursting into the public realm in the mid-1960s, the protest poster has been used all over the world to incite change and empower the voice of the people. This exhibition presents the political poster as a powerful tool for organizing and activating communities in response to some of the most pressing issues over the past 50 years, from the Civil Rights and Anti-War movements to social justice, immigration, environmental causes, and more.

Get with the Action, a title taken from a screenprint by the artist and progressive activist nun Corita Kent, explores the medium of the poster as a communication device — one intended to be publically displayed, produced en masse, and often ephemeral — to inform and energize a wide audience. The works on view, focused on the creative output of the Bay Area and beyond, highlight the power of applied graphic design and its utility in presenting information while rallying citizens around a cause.


2018–

Silicon Valley Community Foundation


The Sanctuary City Project was invited to create six Vinyl Wall Murals at the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.  For this installation we used the six phrases:

This is a sanctuary.
The country of the immigrant is here.
Undocumented Unafraid.
Where will people go?
I am an immigrant.
Why did you come here?

2018–

Thatcher Gallery, University of San Francisco, Quiet Spaces

Sanctuary, a safe place of refuge, can be found not only in a physical place of shelter, but also in the vastness of nature or the comfort of home. It can be rooted in a memory, the peacefulness of solitude, or feelings of nostalgia. Quiet Spaces: Picturing Sanctuary in the Illustrated Book celebrates the many and varied ways in which the idea of personal and collective refuge is represented in image and text in modern illustrated books. Depictions of expansive landscapes, moments of seclusion, and gatherings of loved ones bring the notion of refuge to life. Through a range of printed illustrations and photographs, Quiet Spaces encourages the exploration of diverse experiences and perceptions of sanctuary through the lens of modern illustrated books.


2017–

Institute of Contemporary Art San Jose


The Sanctuary City Project was invited to create an installation at the Institute of Contemporary Art, (ICA) in San Jose, as part of their On The Left exhibition. For this installation we included the Sanctuary Mobile Print Cart and also introduced a new wall mural with the phrase from the poster, “THE COUNTRY OF THE IMMIGRANT IS HERE.”

2017–

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco


In pursuit of this mission, The Sanctuary Print Shop calls for the active participation of the public in creating and distributing powerful messages in support of immigrants’ rights. It facilitates do-it-yourself strategies and activities, including providing a space for visitors to create their own posters and prints in expression of their support for the San Francisco Sanctuary City Ordinance, and serves as a resource center and catalyst for public engagement in the movement to uphold immigrants’ rights.

The Sanctuary Print Shop at YBCA started with a series of questions dealing with immigration, such as:

Q. What would you tell an immigrant?

Q. When did you forget you were an immigrant?

Q. Have you seen an ICE raid?
Q.) What is a Sanctuary?
Q.) Do you anyone that has been deported?

Q. What would you do if you see an ICE raid?

After we received the initial silkscreened response questions, The Sanctuary Print Shop took ten of the participants’ responses and turned them into original posters. The ten posters are:

Not in my city!
This is a sanctuary
A sanctuary is a home away from home.
The country of the immigrant is here.
Undocumented Unafraid.
Where will people go?
I am an immigrant.
Why did you come here?
I am free to leave.
A sanctuary is a quiet place.
I am a refugee.
When did you come here?